Gulf of St. Lawrence
Expedition

The Gulf of St. Lawrence is among the largest and deepest estuaries in the world, covering 236,000 square kilometres, with an average depth of 148 metres.

This expedition was the most in-depth visual exploration of the Gulf of St. Lawrence in Canada’s history and its findings helped protect habitat essential to the health of our oceans.

Exploration

Explored diverse marine ecosystems that connect to the shores of Nova Scotia, Quebec, Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick, visually documenting the larger ocean ecosystem – from the surface to the seafloor.

Science

Used a remotely operated vehicle to collect scientific information, including sediment and specimen samples, and captured high-definition images and video in the Laurentian Channel, American Bank and Cape Breton Trough.

Campaigning

The scientific information that was collected has been used to inform the protection of habitat essential for fish populations, such as redfish, as well as areas essential to the overall health of our oceans.

On August 23, 2017, the expedition team spent a week exploring four ecologically and biologically important areas: the Laurentian Channel South and North, the American Bank and the Cape Breton Trough.

The expedition explored diverse ecosystems that connect to the shores of Nova Scotia, Quebec, Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick. In addition to collecting scientific information, such as sediment and specimen samples, the expedition team also captured high-definition images and video to bring the wonders of the Gulf of St. Lawrence to life for people across Canada. On board, scientists, technicians and visual storytellers, documented the larger ocean ecosystem – from the surface to the seafloor.

Through live broadcasting, online viewers participated in this ocean exploration –seeing a first-hand view of the seafloor, what daily life is like on a research vessel and what it takes for scientists and technicians to conduct their studies at sea.

This expedition helped provide data to support managing and protecting the new 1,000km2 Banc-des-Americains Marine Protected Area, as well as the 2,338 km2 Eastern Honguedo Strait Coral and Sponge Conservation Area and the 423 km2 Eastern Gulf of St. Lawrence Coral Conservation Area.

Protecting marine habitat on all three of Canada’s Coasts


See how Oceana Canada is helping to protect the ocean.

LEARN MORE

Join Oceana Canada


Stay up-to-date on the latest expedition highlights by joining us as a Wavemaker.

SIGN UP

Partners

Oceana Canada


Oceana Canada was established as an independent charity in 2015 and is part of the largest international advocacy group dedicated solely to ocean conservation. Oceana Canada has successfully campaigned to end the shark fin trade, make rebuilding depleted fish populations the law, improve the way fisheries are managed and protect marine habitat. We work with civil society, academics, fishers, Indigenous Peoples and the federal government to return Canada’s formerly vibrant oceans to health and abundance. By restoring Canada’s oceans, we can strengthen our communities, reap greater economic and nutritional benefits and protect our future.

Twitter
Facebook
Instagram
Youtube

Fisheries and Oceans Canada


In Canada, the ability to observe, understand, and make informed decisions regarding the management of our marine ecosystems is largely dependent on the science and monitoring programs conducted by Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) under its Science At-Sea Program.

Over 130 expeditions are conducted annually across Canada’s three oceans by DFO’s scientists on 14 Canadian Coast Guard vessels dedicated to science. DFO’s scientists regularly work with partners from other federal departments, academia, NGOs, international organizations and Indigenous communities to collect key information necessary for the sustainable management of Canada’s oceans and aquatic resources for the benefit of current and future generations.

Twitter
Facebook
Instagram

Other Expeditions

Imappivut

Imappivut



<h2 class=

Northeast Pacific Seamounts

Northeast Pacific Seamounts



<h2 class=

Central Coast of British Columbia

Central Coast of British Columbia



<h2 class=